• The war in Afghanistan has torn the country apart and left more than a quarter of its 26 million people in need of food. Camps have appeared on the border with Pakistan, in the north, hundreds of thousands are trapped behind front lines in the central highlands. Tens of thousands more are in western Afghanistan.

  • After three years of drought, five years of failed harvests and 22 years of war, the refugees have used up what's left of their savings and killed their livestock. In August the camps around Mazar-i-Sharif had a two-week supply of food. After September 11, all, aid was suspended as agencies withdrew. There is however, thousands of tons of food, clothes, and medicine stockpiled about 100 miles away, across the border in Uzbekistan.

Two Afghan girls living in a tent in a refugee camp. It shows how the living conditions have declined in the country during the war.
Two Afghan girls living in a tent in a refugee camp. It shows how the living conditions have declined in the country during the war.
  • As the war in Afghanistan progresses, more and more people become displaced within the country. Houses, schools, and even hospitals are destroyed by the Taliban or by other forces inside the country. The supply of food has reached nearly zero, and many people die of starvation every day. They have resorted to eating moldy bread, insects and even boiled grass. Scurvy has become more prominent as more people are denied the food and the nutrients that they need.

  • The conflict in Afghanistan dates back more than 23 years, and has only become worse since then. Pakistan has started closing its borders to refugees coming from Afghanistan. The government blames refugees for increased crime and social problems, such as drug use and prostitution.
    This picture shows the terrible living conditions faced by refugees.
    This picture shows the terrible living conditions faced by refugees.






For More information, Go to: Afghanistan Refugee Crisis
Sources:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/feb/13/afghanistan
http://www.eurasianet.org/departments/news/articles/eav031609e.shtml